Calendar

Feb
21
Thu
Remembering the Great War: Readings and Conversations about World War I @ Mountain View Barn
Feb 21 – Mar 28 all-day

For information on this event, please click HERE.

Upcoming City Club of Idaho Falls Events
Feb 21 – May 13 all-day

February 21st program-John Hansen Award Lunch.  Award presentation to Honorable Jim Jones (ISU Bennion Building)

March 28th program- Kate Gordon, nationally recognized speaker on climate change (ISU Bennion Building)

April program-Jerry to contact Sir. Xavier Rolet, former London Stock Exchange chief executive to speak on “Brexit” and other international economic news.  Waiting to confirm date in early April (ISU Bennion Building)

April 26th- IHC Event with “American Moonshot” author, Doug Brinkley

May 13th evening program- Greg Carr previewing his newest National Geographic movie at City Club.  Waiting to confirm venue.  This is our Annual Meeting program.

For more information on any of these events, please go to the City Club of Idaho Falls website at:  http://ifcityclub.com/.

Apr
8
Mon
Songs for Your Supper @ Athol Library
Apr 8 @ 6:30 pm

speaker: William Rossiter
In singing about our food we celebrate our identity. Many food songs represent nostalgia for an uncomplicated past, when grandma cooked real food and we turned up our noses at haut cuisine. Ethnic and national groups, for example, preserve an important part of their culture when they serve traditional foods.

These songs are about home cooking, about the ethnic and farm kitchen, pork chops, corned beef and cabbage, lefse, pastries. They are all fall-back dishes when times are tough, and go-to dishes when we need to get back to basics: grits and greens, garden tomatoes, potatoes, lutefisk (not for the sissy). The songs help us understand American cultural, ethnic and social history, a simpler time when the basic rule of nutrition was “Fill ‘er up.”

Songs are accompanied by guitar, banjo, autoharp and harmonica.

Apr
9
Tue
Magic Carpet Made of Steel: Railroad Songs and Lies @ Rathdrum Library
Apr 9 @ 5:30 pm

speaker: William Rossiter
In our cynical age, the romance of the railroad may have faded like the railroads themselves, but those steel rails tied the West to “civilization” and formed a collection of territories into a nation. Songs about railroads display attitudes about the “iron horse,” from the young girl, anticipating the arrival of marriageable railroad workers to the grumpy wagoner, afraid railroads will kill his business and bring in crews of Irishmen! (Oh no! There goes the neighborhood!) Railroad songs and stories help us recapture the wonder the rails once inspired. Using these tunes and yarns, we’ll explore what the railroad meant to the West and its pioneers.

Songs accompanied by guitar, banjo, harmonica and autoharp.

Apr
10
Wed
Going Out West to See the Elephant: How the West was Sung! @ Hayden Library
Apr 10 @ 6:00 pm

speaker: William Rossiter
“How happy am I as I crawl into bed, a rattlesnake rattles a tune at my bed, A coy little centipede, void of all fear, crawls over my pillow and into my ear.” “Seeing the elephant,” they called it. It was the pioneer’s term for getting wised up and fed up. When the 19th century settlers started West, they sang songs about the land of milk and honey. By the time they got here, they rewrote the same songs to tell of rattlesnakes and alkali water.

Apr
11
Thu
All the News That’s Fit to Sing: Scandals, Sensations and Slanders in Song @ Priest River Library
Apr 11 @ 6:00 pm

speaker: William Rossiter
From the beginning of history, we have felt the need to pass the news along often by singing about it. We hear of a fire, a murder, an assassination, a mine disaster, a national or local tragedy or triumph, a living or dead hero and we often come up with the musical equivalent of a tabloid magazine – or, perhaps a blog. These aren’t the songs that made it to the hit parade or the top twenty; in fact, many of these songs showed up originally in the “poet’s corner” in rural newspapers, written to a currently popular tune.

Few of the songs are polished, and often they don’t “get it right,” but many of them are hilarious, and they have guts and directness that make up for what they lack in finesse. And they tell what really happened. No lie. Honest.

Songs are accompanied by guitar, banjo, autoharp and harmonica.

Twin Falls – Hampton Sides @ Turf Club
Apr 11 @ 7:00 pm

Bestselling Author and Journalist Hampton Sides Speaks

Author, historian, and journalist Hampton Sides will be the speaker for the 5th Annual Magic Valley Distinguished Humanities Lecture  and Dinner on Thursday, April 11, 7 p.m. at the Turf Club in Twin Falls. Sides’ latest book, On Desperate Ground, is a chronicle of the extraordinary feats of heroism by Marines called on to do the impossible during the greatest battle of the Korean War. His topic will be “Putting the ‘Story’ Back in History: Why We Need Narratives to Understand Our Past.”

Sides’ lecture is supported in part by the College of Southern Idaho and Idaho Public Television.

Tickets for the dinner lecture are available by clicking HERE or by calling the IHC at 208-345-5346. General tickets are $45, and Benefactor tickets are $75, offering an invitation to a pre-event reception with Sides at a private location at 5 p.m. and seats at the dinner and lecture. IHC always recommends reserving tickets early as the event often sells out. The evening will begin with a no-host reception at 6 p.m. at the Turf Club, 734 Falls Ave. Dinner will be served at 7 p.m. with Sides’ talk to follow. Seating is assigned in advance. Sides’ books will be available from Barnes and Noble onsite and he’ll be available for signing afterwards.

He is the author of the bestselling histories Ghost Soldiers, Blood and Thunder, Hellhound on His Trail, and In the Kingdom of Ice.

Sides is editor-at-large for Outside and a frequent contributor to National Geographic and other magazines. His journalistic work, collected in numerous published anthologies, has been twice nominated for National Magazine Awards for feature writing.

A native of Memphis and a Yale graduate, Hampton is the 2015 Miller Distinguished Scholar at the Santa Fe Institute and an  advisory board member of the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference and the Author’s Guild. He is also a partner of Atalaya Productions, an independent film company that develops non-fiction and historical stories for the screen. A frequent lecturer, Hampton divides his time between Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Colorado College, where he teaches narrative non-fiction and serves as Journalist in Residence.

Apr
13
Sat
All the News That’s Fit to Sing: Scandals, Sensations and Slanders in Song @ Spirit Lake Library
Apr 13 @ 2:00 pm

speaker: William Rossiter
From the beginning of history, we have felt the need to pass the news along often by singing about it. We hear of a fire, a murder, an assassination, a mine disaster, a national or local tragedy or triumph, a living or dead hero and we often come up with the musical equivalent of a tabloid magazine – or, perhaps a blog. These aren’t the songs that made it to the hit parade or the top twenty; in fact, many of these songs showed up originally in the “poet’s corner” in rural newspapers, written to a currently popular tune.

Few of the songs are polished, and often they don’t “get it right,” but many of them are hilarious, and they have guts and directness that make up for what they lack in finesse. And they tell what really happened. No lie. Honest.

Songs are accompanied by guitar, banjo, autoharp and harmonica.

Apr
15
Mon
Historical Idaho Women Stories and Folksongs @ Potlatch Public Library
Apr 15 @ 6:00 pm

speaker: Tracy Morrison
In 1883, Sarah Winnemucca was the first Native American woman to publish an autobiography “Life Among the Paiutes, Their Wrongs and Claims” documenting the first 40 years of experiences between her people and European settlers. Polly Bemis was shipped to America by the slave trade, and became a free woman after many years of servitude. Kittie Wilkins, the Horse Queen of Idaho, was the only woman horse breeder of her time who supplied thousands of horses all over North America. Historical Idaho Women Stories and Folksongs, presents brief introduction stories followed by original songs recognizing historical Idaho women.

Apr
16
Tue
Historical Idaho Women Stories and Folksongs @ Bovill Community Library
Apr 16 @ 6:00 pm
speaker: Tracy Morrison
In 1883, Sarah Winnemucca was the first Native American woman to publish an autobiography “Life Among the Paiutes, Their Wrongs and Claims” documenting the first 40 years of experiences between her people and European settlers. Polly Bemis was shipped to America by the slave trade, and became a free woman after many years of servitude. Kittie Wilkins, the Horse Queen of Idaho, was the only woman horse breeder of her time who supplied thousands of horses all over North America. Historical Idaho Women Stories and Folksongs, presents brief introduction stories followed by original songs recognizing historical Idaho women.