Apr
10
Fri
Hemingway Literary Center: Exile, Refuge, Home @ See details below
Apr 10 all-day

Fall:
Nov. 1: Rajia Hassib, author of A Pure Heart, student luncheon, author talk/reading
Nov. 7: Enda Duffy, invited talk, “Wild Irish: The Emigrant People’s History of Irish Literature”
Dec. 6: Paul O’Mahoney, Actor and Director from the British theater company, Out of Chaos
Dec. 10: Making Boise Home: the Refugee and Immigrant Experience in Idaho, panel presentations by community groups

Spring:
Feb. 26: Boise State Meistersingers, directed by Prof. Michael Porter, performance of works based on Langston Hughes’s poetry
Feb. 26: Meta DuEwa Jones, invited talk, “Black Visual Alchemy: How Poets and Artists Map Diaspora Memory”
Mar. TBD: Arturo Arias, invited talk, “Latinx Cultural Studies: Recovering Lost Footprints”
Mar. TBD: The BSU Faculty Brass Quintet, directed by Prof. Zach Biue, Music of Armenia and its Diaspora: A Story of Tragedy, Resilience, and Renewal
Apr. TBD: Idaho Museum of International Diaspora keynote speaker, refugee author talk and related art exhibit (still being decided by IMID board)
May TBD: “Creating Home: Campus Engagement and the Refugee Community,” Panel presentation
(Month?): Jessica Bauman, director, performing Shakespeare with refugees

Lit for Lunch:
September 13 Hassib, A Pure Heart
October 11 Nguyen, The Refugees
November 8 Hamid, Exit West
December 13 Tobar, The Tattooed Soldier
February 14: Frazier, Harlem Mosaics
March 13: Erpenbeck, Go Went Gone
April 10: Nayeri, The Ungrateful Refugee
May 8: Werfel, The Forty Days of Musa Dagh

All performances, talks, and readings will take place in the Hemingway Center Gallery and the Student Union Building rooms at Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725.
Lit for Lunch book discussions will take place in the Bingham Room at the Main Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, ID 83725.

Apr
15
Wed
The Cabin’s Reading & Conversations 2019-20 Season @ See details below
Apr 15 all-day

Since 2002 The Cabin’s Readings & Conversations (R&C) lecture series has brought some of the best authors, thinkers, rabble-rousers, and cultural icons to Boise. Each year, our reading, lecture, and discussion series brings five highly acclaimed, dynamic authors to speak to audiences of 750 to 2000 people at the Morrison Center and the historic Egyptian Theater. The Cabin’s beloved program gives audience members a chance to hear Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winners, MacArthur Fellows, and bestseller book-club phenomena share their work, personal stories, and commentary on current events and culture.

Through Readings & Conversations lectures, audience members receive insight into the author’s craft, point of view, and written and real life perspectives. Each event opens with the Executive Director updating the audience on The Cabin’s recent work in the community, as well as thank yous and sponsorship recognition, before introducing the author. R&C authors discuss and read from their work for forty-five minutes. They are encouraged to divulge their sources of inspiration, their writing habits, possible future projects, and take on world events at large. Then, the author responds to direct questions from the audience for twenty to thirty minutes. After leaving the stage, participants are welcome to meet the author and have their books signed in the lobby. Whenever possible, authors engage with the local community through school visits or meet-and-greets in addition to their evening lecture.

R&C is a longstanding Cabin program. By bringing speakers of varied cultural, socio-economic backgrounds and viewpoints together R&C helps build cross-cultural understanding making our community stronger.

The Morrison Center
2201 West Cesar Chavez Ln
Boise, ID 83702

The Egyptian Theater
700 W. Main Street
Boise ID 83702

The Cabin has scheduled dates for the 2019-20 R&C series as follows:

Ta-Nehisi Coates, October 7, 2019
Ann Patchett, October 15, 2019
Jad Abumrad, February 1, 2020
Francisco Cantu’, March 4, 2020
Madeline Miller, April 15th, 2020

Apr
22
Wed
Our Changing Climate: Finding Common Ground Through Climate Fiction. @ See details below
Apr 22 all-day

“When I was younger, I could play outside any time I wanted to. Now, going outside can be dangerous.” This observation came from a high school senior during a conversation in Coeur d’Alene about climate change, an event sponsored by my recent IHC Opportunity Grant, “Our Changing Climate: Finding Common Ground Through Climate Fiction.” These words began this young man’s longer narrative about hazardous smoke from wildfires in the summer of 2017. He had been visiting the neighboring city of Spokane, Washington, he explained, headed to the Apple store. But the store was closed. All of the stores were closed. The smoke was too thick; the air quality was dangerous. His story ended with a moving admission and a striking shift from the past tense to the present: “I am really scared.”

This young man had never thought of local weather as related to climate change, but our conversation–guided by an interactive approach to Barbara Kingsolver’s novel FLIGHT BEHAVIOR and supplemented with scientific data about climate change–prompted a lightbulb moment for him. He shared his story with passion and sincerity, and he stayed afterwards to keep talking with the range of people assembled: a mix of men and women of various ages, with different religious beliefs, and a range of expertise, too. Among the participants were an environmental engineer, a geologist, and an audience member with degrees in biology and law. On the anonymous, post-event surveys we circulated, this student and his three classmates (who had been prompted to attend the event for extra credit in the college-level philosophy course they were taking for dual credit) all indicated that our event “enhanced my understanding of what science is” and “helped me see how people with different beliefs might speak with empathy to each other.” Three of the four said it “made me think differently about climate change in my home community.” One (perhaps the student who had the lightbulb moment, but we can’t be sure) said it “changed my views about climate change” and circled “concerned” to indicate his current views.

This project emerged from the UI Confluence Lab (overview attached), one goal of which is addressing climate change communication. Very few Idahoans (or Americans) discuss climate change even occasionally, but everyone has a story to tell about it. Our events give people the space and opportunity to share those stories. We draw on the latest National Park Service (NPS) strategies for engaging environmental issues with a diverse public. The agency’s audience-centered engagement (ACE) approach seeks the co-creation of knowledge with community members by improving competencies for exploring complex questions. Combined with humanities strategies for talking about literature, our approach invites audiences to treat both personal stories and climate science as crucial data about our changing climate. We hope to hold five more of these community conversations throughout Idaho in spring of 2020.

Additional occasions for climate change conversations will be available in five Idaho communities: Lewiston; Sandpoint and Bonner’s Ferry; Grangeville and McCall. Venues in these five towns are TBD, but we will look for community-oriented, non-academic spaces that will encourage a more diverse audience than public libraries or campuses would. In Grangeville, we are likely to use The Gallery, a local restaurant with a meeting space in back that often hosts people for “Let’s Talk About It.” We are seeking similar venues in the other towns.

Tentative dates include: April 22 and 23 for Sandpoint and Bonner’s Ferry.  The Lewiston date is flexible.  Grangeville and McCall events could take place during the week of March 15-20.

Apr
23
Thu
Our Changing Climate: Finding Common Ground Through Climate Fiction. @ See details below
Apr 23 all-day

“When I was younger, I could play outside any time I wanted to. Now, going outside can be dangerous.” This observation came from a high school senior during a conversation in Coeur d’Alene about climate change, an event sponsored by my recent IHC Opportunity Grant, “Our Changing Climate: Finding Common Ground Through Climate Fiction.” These words began this young man’s longer narrative about hazardous smoke from wildfires in the summer of 2017. He had been visiting the neighboring city of Spokane, Washington, he explained, headed to the Apple store. But the store was closed. All of the stores were closed. The smoke was too thick; the air quality was dangerous. His story ended with a moving admission and a striking shift from the past tense to the present: “I am really scared.”

This young man had never thought of local weather as related to climate change, but our conversation–guided by an interactive approach to Barbara Kingsolver’s novel FLIGHT BEHAVIOR and supplemented with scientific data about climate change–prompted a lightbulb moment for him. He shared his story with passion and sincerity, and he stayed afterwards to keep talking with the range of people assembled: a mix of men and women of various ages, with different religious beliefs, and a range of expertise, too. Among the participants were an environmental engineer, a geologist, and an audience member with degrees in biology and law. On the anonymous, post-event surveys we circulated, this student and his three classmates (who had been prompted to attend the event for extra credit in the college-level philosophy course they were taking for dual credit) all indicated that our event “enhanced my understanding of what science is” and “helped me see how people with different beliefs might speak with empathy to each other.” Three of the four said it “made me think differently about climate change in my home community.” One (perhaps the student who had the lightbulb moment, but we can’t be sure) said it “changed my views about climate change” and circled “concerned” to indicate his current views.

This project emerged from the UI Confluence Lab (overview attached), one goal of which is addressing climate change communication. Very few Idahoans (or Americans) discuss climate change even occasionally, but everyone has a story to tell about it. Our events give people the space and opportunity to share those stories. We draw on the latest National Park Service (NPS) strategies for engaging environmental issues with a diverse public. The agency’s audience-centered engagement (ACE) approach seeks the co-creation of knowledge with community members by improving competencies for exploring complex questions. Combined with humanities strategies for talking about literature, our approach invites audiences to treat both personal stories and climate science as crucial data about our changing climate. We hope to hold five more of these community conversations throughout Idaho in spring of 2020.

Additional occasions for climate change conversations will be available in five Idaho communities: Lewiston; Sandpoint and Bonner’s Ferry; Grangeville and McCall. Venues in these five towns are TBD, but we will look for community-oriented, non-academic spaces that will encourage a more diverse audience than public libraries or campuses would. In Grangeville, we are likely to use The Gallery, a local restaurant with a meeting space in back that often hosts people for “Let’s Talk About It.” We are seeking similar venues in the other towns.

Tentative dates include: April 22 and 23 for Sandpoint and Bonner’s Ferry.  The Lewiston date is flexible.  Grangeville and McCall events could take place during the week of March 15-20.

Apr
24
Fri
Indie Lens Pop-Up Free Film Screening 2019/20 @ See details below
Apr 24 all-day

Indie Lens Pop-Up is a neighborhood series that brings people together for film screenings and community-driven conversations. Featuring documentaries seen on PBS’s Independent Lens, Indie Lens Pop-Up draws local residents, leaders and organizations to discuss what matters most, from newsworthy topics and social issues, to family and community relationships. Make friends, share stories, and join the conversation.

Each of the six films will be shown, at no charge to attendees, in the Sligar Auditorium of the Twin Falls Center for the Arts, 195 River Vista Place, Twin Falls, ID

The 2019-2020 series offers six documentary films which explore the human condition and examine important issues. The 2019-20 films are:

DECADE OF FIRE by Vivian Vázquez Irizarry, Gretchen Hildebran, and Julia Steele Allen – In the 1970s, fires raged through the South Bronx. Abandoned by landlords and city officials, nearly a half million residents were displaced from their beloved neighborhood.  November 1 – November 20, 2019

THE FIRST RAINBOW COALITION by Ray Santisteban – In 1969, the Chicago Black Panther Party began to form a multi-ethnic coalition with the Young Lords Organization and the Young Patriots. Banding together in one of the most segregated cities in post-war America, the Rainbow Coalition changed the face of Chicago politics and created an organizing model for future activists and politicians.  November 13, 2019 – January 5, 2020

EATING UP EASTER by Sergio Mata’u Rapu. More than just a picture postcard of iconic stone statues, Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, is a microcosm of a planet in flux. Native Rapanui grapple with a booming tourism trade that rakes in money but brings about a changing climate that threatens the fragile ecology on the island.  December 16, 2019 – February 2, 2020

ALWAYS IN SEASON, by Jacqueline Olive, showcases descendants of the victims and perpetrators of lynching are working together to heal a violent history. Blending observational footage with first-person testimonies and expert input, the film examines the lingering impact of lynching and the link between this historic form of racial terrorism and the racial violence that exists today.  January 17 – March 1, 2020

BEDLAM by Kenneth Paul Rosenberg – Filmmaker and practicing psychiatrist, Rosenberg visits ERs, jails, and homeless camps to examine our national mental health crisis. He follows the poignant stories of people grappling with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other chronic psychiatric conditions, whose silence and shame often worsen the suffering.  March 2 – April 12, 2020

RECORDER: THE MARION STOKES PROJECT by Matt Wolf – Marion Stokes secretly recorded television twenty-four hours a day for thirty years. It started in 1979 with the dawn of the 24-hour news cycle and ended when Marion passed away in 2012. In total, She recorded on 70,000 VHS tapes, capturing revolutions, lies, wars, triumphs, and catastrophes that tell us who we were and how television has shaped the world of today.  April 24 – June 14, 2020

Exploring Warm Springs Avenue: History and Architecture @ Boise WaterShed
Apr 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Speaker:  Barbara Perry Bauer

Barbara Perry Bauer shows how Boise’s Warm Springs Avenue is rich in history and architecture.  She will explain how it grew from farms to mansions after the discovery of geothermal heat in 1890 and became known as one of Boise’s finest neighborhoods.  She will chronicle the fascinating history of this premier street.

Apr
30
Thu
Pulitzer Prize-winning Historian T.J. Stiles Event POSTPONED @ The DEC - Downtown Event Center
Apr 30 @ 7:00 pm

 

EVENT POSTPONED

Two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, historian T.J. Stiles will be the speaker at the Idaho Humanities Council’s 13th Annual Eastern Idaho Distinguished Humanities Lecture and Dinner on Thursday, April 30, 7 p.m., at the DEC*, 480 Park Ave., in Idaho Falls. Stiles will speak about his last book Custer’s Trials: A Life on the Frontier of a New America, which won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for History.

General tickets are $50 and Benefactor tickets are $75. Benefactors are invited to a small private pre-event reception with Mr. Stiles at 5:30 p.m. The evening will begin with a no-host reception and music at 6:15 p.m. at the DEC. Dinner will be served at 7 p.m., with Stiles’s talk to follow. Stiles’s books will be available from Barnes and Noble onsite for signing afterwards.

Custer’s Trials paints a portrait of Gen. George Armstrong Custer both deeply personal and sweeping in scope, proving how much of Custer’s legacy has been ignored. He demolishes Custer’s historical caricature, revealing a volatile, contradictory, intense person – capable yet insecure, intelligent yet bigoted, passionate yet self-destructive, a romantic individualist at odds with the institution of the military (he was court-martialed twice in six years). The key to understanding Custer, Stiles writes, is that he lived on a frontier in time.

Stiles also won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Biography and the 2009 National Book Award for Nonfiction for his critically acclaimed book The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt. Stiles served as historical adviser and on-screen expert for Jesse James and Grand Central, two films in the PBS documentary series American Experience. He has written for The New York Times Book Review, Smithsonian, Salon, the Los Angeles Times, and other publications.

A native of Benton County, Minnesota, Stiles studied history at Carleton College and Columbia University, and resided in New York City for twenty years. He lives in San Francisco with his wife and son.

*Denotes new venue this year. Seating is limited.

Supported in part by:

The William J. and Shirley A. Maeck Family Foundation

May
1
Fri
Immerse and Engage with Impressionism at BAM @ Boise Art Museum
May 1 all-day

From November 2019 to November 2020, Boise Art Museum (BAM) will present “Women in Impressionism: Masterworks from the Smithsonian American Art Museum” (SAAM), featuring three Impressionist masterworks from SAAM’s collection: Mary Cassatt’s “Spanish Dancer Wearing a Lace Mantilla” (1873), Frederick Carl Frieseke’s “Nude Seated at Her Dressing Table” (1909), and Childe Hassam’s “Tanagra (The Builders, New York)” (1918).  Each of these portraits provides a distinctive view of women at the turn of the 20th century, filtered through the lens of the artist’s experience. Cassatt’s travels in Spain, Frieseke’s residence at the Giverny art colony, and Hassam’s urban lifestyle in New York City, are expressed through their individual choices of palette, pose, and setting. This exhibition will provide a view of the American Impressionist movement, and afford visitors the unique opportunity to experience artworks by three of the United States’ preeminent artists.

Timeline:

November 9, 2019 – exhibition opens
December 2019 – education programs commence
December 2019 – May 2020 – Free School Tour Program for high school students
January 2020 – winter “salon conversation” event
April 2020 – spring “salon conversation” event
September – November 2020 – Free School Tour Program for high school students continues
November 8, 2020 – exhibition closes

May
8
Fri
Hemingway Literary Center: Exile, Refuge, Home @ See details below
May 8 all-day

Fall:
Nov. 1: Rajia Hassib, author of A Pure Heart, student luncheon, author talk/reading
Nov. 7: Enda Duffy, invited talk, “Wild Irish: The Emigrant People’s History of Irish Literature”
Dec. 6: Paul O’Mahoney, Actor and Director from the British theater company, Out of Chaos
Dec. 10: Making Boise Home: the Refugee and Immigrant Experience in Idaho, panel presentations by community groups

Spring:
Feb. 26: Boise State Meistersingers, directed by Prof. Michael Porter, performance of works based on Langston Hughes’s poetry
Feb. 26: Meta DuEwa Jones, invited talk, “Black Visual Alchemy: How Poets and Artists Map Diaspora Memory”
Mar. TBD: Arturo Arias, invited talk, “Latinx Cultural Studies: Recovering Lost Footprints”
Mar. TBD: The BSU Faculty Brass Quintet, directed by Prof. Zach Biue, Music of Armenia and its Diaspora: A Story of Tragedy, Resilience, and Renewal
Apr. TBD: Idaho Museum of International Diaspora keynote speaker, refugee author talk and related art exhibit (still being decided by IMID board)
May TBD: “Creating Home: Campus Engagement and the Refugee Community,” Panel presentation
(Month?): Jessica Bauman, director, performing Shakespeare with refugees

Lit for Lunch:
September 13 Hassib, A Pure Heart
October 11 Nguyen, The Refugees
November 8 Hamid, Exit West
December 13 Tobar, The Tattooed Soldier
February 14: Frazier, Harlem Mosaics
March 13: Erpenbeck, Go Went Gone
April 10: Nayeri, The Ungrateful Refugee
May 8: Werfel, The Forty Days of Musa Dagh

All performances, talks, and readings will take place in the Hemingway Center Gallery and the Student Union Building rooms at Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725.
Lit for Lunch book discussions will take place in the Bingham Room at the Main Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, ID 83725.

May
9
Sat
Women’s Rights, Bikes, and Bloomers @ See details below
May 9 – Sep 20 all-day

An exhibit to local Women’s Suffrage in the Northern Pacific Railroad Depot Museum. The exhibit will include fashions and photographs of 1920.
Rails to Trails bicycle rides in Shoshone County, Idaho.
Local Wallace restaurants will contribute menu and dinning options to commemorate Women’s suffrage.
Dr. Janet Worthington will give a Chautauqua Character of Amelia Bloomer, performance in the NPR Depot Museum, to explain this woman’s influence in the fashion industry and the convenience of riding a bicycle.
Ms Vicki Allmann, will perform the Chautauqua Character of May Arkwright Hutton as she advocated for Idaho women the right to vote in 1896,
Dr. Heather Branstetter, author of Selling Sex in the Silver Valley will lecture on the strength of Idaho/Silver Valley women in the sustainable community.
Dr. Katherine Aiken, University of Idaho Professor Emeritus, lecture on women’s suffrage and prohibition in northern Idaho.

9 May 2020 Official opening of the Woman’s Suffrage, Bikes and Bloomers exhibit in the Road Master’s Room of the exhibit. This is also Depot Day & Classic Car Show, a fund raising event for the museum and foundation.
All summer Restaurants in Historic Wallace will prepare and highlight foods and customs from the era of women’s suffrage.
Sixth Street Theater will highlight women’s suffrage in the summer theater.
24 June 2020 Ms Vicki Allmann as May Arkwright Hutton champion for Idaho women’s rights and the right to vote.
30 July 2020 Dr. Heather Branstetter, lecture on the strength and character of women in the Coeur d’Alene Mining District
26 August 2020 Dr. Janet Worthington, Amelia bloomer comes to life on the Route of the Hiawatha/lecture in character at the NPR Depot Museum.
Shoshone County Resource Center, fund raising event on the Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes
September 20 Dr. Katherine Aiken, lecture at the NPR Depot on women’s suffrage and prohibition in northern Idaho.