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Join us every other Tuesday for a virtual Connected Conversation to discuss various humanities topics with people around Idaho, both the serious and the fun. Subjects span Boise’s industrial history, history of Hawai’i, Godzilla, and even nuclear energy. These talks are typically Noon Mountain time during the summer, and 6pm Mountain Time during the winter. Each speaker talks about their topic for about 40 minutes and then will take questions. Our most recent topics looked at the Tulsa Race Massacre (formerly known as the Tulsa Race Riots), Women’s clubs in Idaho, Stonewall, and the Sandpoint Archaeological Project.

Are these recorded if I miss a topic I was interested in?

We do record our conversations! You can access our archive on the IHC website and YouTube. These recording include both the presentation and the Q&A portions. There are currently no ads added in as well.  To view these recordings, keep scrolling to the bottom of this page!

For more information, please contact Jennifer Holley, Director of Programs & Development (jennifer@idahohumanities) or Doug Exton, Program Officer (doug@idahohumanities.org).

Title:  Selling Things and Selling Sex: Archaeological Explorations of Sandpoint, Idaho
June 29, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM MT 
Speaker:  Mark Warner, Professor of Anthropology, University of Idaho

Program Description:  From 2008 to 2014 a team of archaeologists conducted a series of excavations in the north Idaho town of Sandpoint. Ultimately, the project proved to be one of the largest projects in the state’s history recovering several hundred thousand artifacts.  There are multiple themes that came out of this project. In this talk Dr. Warner will talk about two of their findings: a broad question of Sandpoint’s early economic connections to the world and a local question that many don’t think about - namely the economics of prostitution in Sandpoint. Underlying this talk is a goal of sharing how archaeology of the recent past can contribute in unexpected ways to understanding (and sharing) the past.

Bio:  Mark Warner is an historical archaeologist with over thirty years of experience in archaeology.  He has worked in many parts of the U.S. and conducted major excavations in Maryland, Oklahoma, and in the Inland Northwest. Recent work in the region included the Sandpoint Archaeology Project (the largest CRM project in the state’s history), and multiple public archaeology projects in Boise and Moscow, ID which were visited by approximately 3500 people.  A native of Michigan, Warner did his Master’s work at the University of Maryland and his Ph.D. at the University of Virginia.  He has been teaching at the University of Idaho since 1998. While at Idaho, he has authored or edited four books, two thematic journal issues, multiple articles and generated over $900,000 in funding. He is the immediate past president of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

After you sign up via Eventbrite you will receive the link to the Zoom conversation via email. Here's a quick guide to getting started using Zoom.


The views expressed by our speakers do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) or the Idaho Humanities Council (IHC).

Fremont Society
July 13, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM MT
Speaker:  Judson Finley, Archaeologist, PhD in Anthropology, Washington State University

Program Description:  More information to come!

Bio:  Judson Finley is an archaeologist who received his PhD in anthropology from Washington State University. Judson's specialty is the geological interface with Native history of the West.

After you sign up via Eventbrite you will receive the link to the Zoom conversation via email. Here's a quick guide to getting started using Zoom.


The views expressed by our speakers do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) or the Idaho Humanities Council (IHC).

Gilles, Giants, and Dragons, Oh My!: The Reinvention of Folkloric Festivals in Belgium
July 27, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM MT
Speaker:  Erik Hadley, Lecturer in the History Department at Boise State University

Program Description:  Ritualized festivals in Francophone Belgium (Wallonia) are focal points of civic pride and serve as vehicles for local expressions of historical commemoration. Numerous saint-military marches received UNESCO recognition as examples of “Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity” in 2012. The annual processionals involve hundreds of marchers from local communities dressed in Napoleonic-era military uniforms, carrying authentic muskets and escorting a saint statue. Many of these marchers trace family involvement back multiple generations. The small town of Binche became renowned for its Carnival festivities, which included les Gilles – local men dressed in masks with enormous ostrich plume headdresses. In the cities of Mons and Ath, saint processionals transformed into large-scale ritualized celebrations which strayed from their roots as disciplined and formal manifestations of piety into carnivalesque celebrations centering on giant statues, (Ath) and mock combat with a dragon (Mons). These three festivals have also received UNESCO recognition: the Carnival of Binche in 2003 and Le Doudou of Mons and La Ducasse of Ath in 2005. All of these ritualized festivals, which date to the late-medieval and early modern eras, ceased during the French revolutionary regime. Commemoration only revived during the mid-19th century and multiple factors influenced the reconstruction of these festivals. This talk explores the 19th-century reinvention of Wallonian folkloric traditions, their evolution through the 20thcentury, and how these little-known local festivals became the cultural centerpieces of these communities in the present-day.

Bio:  Dr. Erik Hadley received his BA in History from the University of Montana and MA and PhD in History from University at Buffalo, with specializations in Early Modern Europe and the Atlantic World. He is a lecturer in the History Department at Boise State University, where he teaches classes on medieval and early modern Europe and oceanic histories of the Atlantic and Pacific Worlds. His research interests center on cultural history, particularly folkloric rituals, identity and popular commemoration, in both Western Europe and indigenous peoples in the Americas and Hawai’i. Dr. Hadley is the recipient of 2019-2020 Fulbright Research U.S. Scholar grant to Belgium to study the historical evolution, commemoration and public memory of UNESCO-recognized folkloric ritual festivals dating back the late Middle Ages and has authored numerous articles on historic cultural identity in French-speaking Belgium.

After you sign up via Eventbrite you will receive the link to the Zoom conversation via email. Here's a quick guide to getting started using Zoom.


The views expressed by our speakers do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) or the Idaho Humanities Council (IHC).

The End of the Cold War and American Culture
August 10, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM MT
Speaker:  Dr. Sarah Robey

Program Description:  The Berlin Wall, Polish Solidarity, Tiananmen Square, the dissolution of the Soviet Union: the end of the Cold War created cultural and political reverberations around the globe. Americans celebrated the United States’ triumph over the Soviet Union, having “won” a conflict that had dominated international affairs for half a century. Yet the end of the Cold War wrought changes in American culture that are sometimes difficult to trace, especially in comparison to the waves of revolution and mass demonstration that characterized other parts of the world between 1989 and 1991. This talk will explore some of the subtle ways that the end of the Cold War influenced American culture, many aspects of which have only become apparent in the three decades since. I contend that the experience of the 1980s and 1990s not only helps us understand American culture in the era since September 11, 2001, but also lends insight into the lasting influence of these decades in American culture today, from pop culture to politics.

Bio:  Dr. Sarah Robey is Assistant Professor of History at Idaho State University, where she teaches courses in American history, the history of the Cold War, the history of science and technology, and the history of energy. Her research focuses on the intersection of American culture and public life and the history of nuclear science and technology. Her first book, Atomic Americans: Citizens in a Nuclear State, will be published with Cornell University Press in early 2022. She also has a forthcoming chapter in Energy Cinema (West Virginia University Press, 2022), which explores how popular entertainment served as public nuclear education in the early Cold War. Robey holds a PhD in History from Temple University and has held past fellowships at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the Miller Center for Public Affairs at the University of Virginia, and the Philadelphia History Museum.

After you sign up via Eventbrite you will receive the link to the Zoom conversation via email. Here's a quick guide to getting started using Zoom.


The views expressed by our speakers do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) or the Idaho Humanities Council (IHC).

The Battle of the Alamo in Mexican, Texan, and United States History
August 24, 2021 12:00 PM-1:00 PM MT
Speaker:  Frank de la Teja, Regents’ Professor Emeritus and University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Texas State University

Program Description:  While the fall of the Alamo on March 6, 1836, has become an iconic moment in Texas--and due to the influence of Hollywood in American history--it was only one event in a chain that began decades earlier in Mexico's struggle for independence from Spain and stretched through the American Civil War. The siege and battle of the Alamo is a good way, then, to examine how ethnic, racial, political, economic, and social tensions in the westering of the United States worked themselves out in the face of Mexican and indigenous interests in what was to become the American Southwest.

Jesús F. “Frank” de la Teja is Regents’ Professor Emeritus and University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Texas State University in San Marcos. He obtained the Ph.D. in Latin American history from the University of Texas at Austin, and between 1985 and 1991 he worked in the Archives and Records Division of the Texas General Land Office. In 2018-2020 he served as Chief Executive Officer of the Texas State Historical Association.

He has published extensively on Spanish, Mexican, and Republic-era Texas, including the award-winning San Antonio de Béxar: A Community on New Spain’s Northern Frontier, and most recently Faces of Béxar: Writings on Early San Antonio and Texas. He served as book review editor for the Southwestern Historical Quarterly from 1997 to 2014 and as managing editor of Catholic Southwest: A Journal of History and Culture from 1991 to 2005.

He has served on the board of directors, as president, and as executive director of the Texas State Historical Association. Among his service activities in the area of history education, he was part of the content development team for the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum from 1998 to 2001, served as an expert reviewer of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills Social Studies standards for the State Board of Education in 2009-2010, and has been a textbook reviewer and author at both the K-12 and college levels since 1992.

He was the inaugural State Historian of Texas (2007-2009), is a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association and the Texas Catholic Historical Society, is a member by election of the Texas Institute of Letters and the Philosophical Society of Texas. Frank was a member of the Humanities Texas board of directors 2011-2016, and currently serves on the board of the Texas Historical Foundation, among other service activities. He is both an honorary admiral in the Texas Navy and an honorary member of the Sons of the Republic of Texas. Among his honors, in 2009 he was awarded the Captain Alonso de León Medal for Merit in History—International category from the Historical, Geographical, and Statistical Society of Nuevo León. And, in 2017 the San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy named him a Hero of San Jacinto.

After you sign up via Eventbrite you will receive the link to the Zoom conversation via email. Here's a quick guide to getting started using Zoom.


The views expressed by our speakers do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) or the Idaho Humanities Council (IHC).

Past Conversations

Jennifer Stevens

“Boise’s Industrial Past”

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“History of Idaho Falls Baseball - 80th Season of Professional Baseball in Idaho Falls"

Scott Slovic Pic

"Semester in the Wild at U of I"

Larry_LaRocco 2

"History of the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness"

Click picture for video

"LGBTQIA+ History in Boise"

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"The Black Experience in Idaho"

Dan Prinzing

"The Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial"

Marc Johnson

"Idaho’s Most Controversial Politician: Glen H. Taylor, the Singing Senator"

Ryan Weeks INL

"How INL is Changing the Future of Nuclear Energy"

HanakoHeadshot (002)

"Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp"

ZINK_A

"Native Women Writers and Colonial Domesticity at the Federal Indian Boarding Schools"

Rick Just

"The History of Idaho State Parks"

Salome Mwangi

"The Refugee Experience and Boise"

Kathy Aiken

"Seeking Suffrage: The Idaho Story"

Communication department photo, portraits, Allison Corona photo.

"Beyond Fake News: News Literacy and the Informed Citizen"

kerry-hunter

"Approaching the US Constitution: Sacred Covenant or Plaything For Lawyers and Judges"

roy-alyson

"Victory and Triumph in Ancient Rome"

Steven J. Pyne

"Fire’s American Century"

Carole Skinner

"A Dialogue on Independent Film"

Michael Faison

"A Discussion on the Arts and the Humanities"

Alex Meregaglia

"Discovering Vardis Fisher’s Boise: Reexamining Idaho and the Federal Writers Project"

Lisa McClain

"Women in Art During the Renaissance and Reformation"

Chelsee Boehm 2

"Archie Boyd Teater: Art, Architecture, Artifacts & Archives"

Wallace, ID

"The History of Wallace, Idaho"

Matthew Miles

"The History of Presidential Inaugurations"

Erik Hadley, History, faculty/staff, studio portrait by Priscilla Grover

"From Alcatraz to Mauna Kea"

Peter Black

"The Nazi Rise to Power and The Consolidation of Power, 1918-1938"

HannaLore Hein

"Working Together Before, During, and After the Progressive Era: The Legacy of Women’s Clubs in Idaho"

Bill Tsutsui

"Godzilla and the Imagination of Anxiety, from Hiroshima to COVID-19"

Stonewall

"History of Stonewall"